23Jun
Whether you are personally performing the search for that next candidate or hiring an outside professional vendor, BEFORE you begin the “chase,” remember, you want to find one that is the best for YOUR company. We know that quality candidates are in demand; however, someone who would be a good match for one company may not be a good fit for yours.

And remember, there is no such thing as a perfect prospect.

The world is yours when you lower your expectations and consider a candidate who may not be perfect but could be a true asset to your company.
Before you begin your search, an accurate job description is one of the most essential tools you can have. One of the biggest mistakes employers make is to create a vague illustration of what the potential employee can expect while “on the job.”
You will want to include:
  • job title
  • position’s purpose
  • specific required skills
  • required, and preferred qualifications
  • overall responsibilities
  • company culture
If you work with a professional staffing solutions provider, they will work closely with you to fine-tune the description. Using their expertise to compose something truthful and attract the desired candidates is a bonus. Either way, you want to be upfront and clear about the expectations of the role.
When developing the job description, the most successful employers will determine what they must absolutely have and what they could live without, initially. Think back to when you first began your career. Did you have all the skills necessary for your dream job? Or did you develop them over time? We know that you can teach some skills more quickly than others. If the right person is in front of you but lacks some capabilities on your list, they can learn if they have the right attitude and aptitude.
Note: The above is only valid if:
  • you don't need that skill immediately for your company to function
  • you have the time to invest in training or the resources to outsource to a third-party vendor, or they can learn "on the job."
  • the candidate has many of the other abilities and has the motivation to learn quickly (you can set a timeframe for the learning before hiring)

Upfront Impressions

If you’re like most busy employers, performing a proper candidate search can be frustrating. But the more reliant your business is on a particular position in the company, the more critical it is to fill that role with someone who will be an asset. Many companies have the best candidate in front of them. Still, during the interactions that follow an initial interview, it could be a turnoff if you don’t put effort into that “after interview” communication. Some examples are:

  • Being very vague about compensation and benefits – do your research to be competitive in your industry. Adding unique perks and benefits are incentives to sweeten the offer.
  • Neglecting to take the time to check the references that were so important to collect from the beginning.
  • Response time to phone calls and emails to thank you, inquire about the hiring status, or ask a follow-up question.

Another internal person can also oversee the above, but the point is that someone MUST manage them. Otherwise, it’s easy for a potential candidate to assume your culture is inflexible and unwelcoming. Employees want a nurturing employer that allows them to thrive and help the company succeed.

The above tasks become more manageable when you work with a qualified staffing company as they will handle the day-to-day communication.

Invest in the most promising people, not the most flawless. No one is perfect, and if someone has the best mindset and majority of the required qualifications, the fit will usually mean a loyal and motivated employee.

When you open your mind and align your expectations from the beginning, you will ensure successful onboarding and an employee who is there for the long haul to help your company grow.

Are you about to launch a candidate search? Lone Star Staffing Solutions is here to help from the beginning of the process to the actual hire. We take care of the mundane tasks and bring you the candidates we feel would be the best fit for your company.
23Jun
For many businesses, day-to-day office functions are back to normal or almost there. And, as incoming business increases, it may be a sign that it’s time to ensure you can scale to manage everything.
If you’re like so many other businesses who found it necessary to lay off employees during the pandemic, you may now be in a position where you need to “replenish” your team.

Some of us may feel a little rusty, but when it comes to ensuring you’re up-to-date with all things human resource-related, this is an excellent time to make sure your ducks are in a row.

Let’s talk about what you should focus on initially to get things back on track before hiring new employees.

What is Your Company Culture?

Why is this such a critical question? Because it will be impossible for you to properly relay this information to hiring partners or potential employees if you don't know yourself. In addition, quality candidates will want to know what to expect so that they're able to make an educated decision before considering employment with your company. Ask yourself:

  • What are your company values?
  • Do you have clear expectations for your employees?
  • Is it apparent that you are open to diversity?
  • Are you open to new ideas so that the team can feel challenged and valued?

If you have an up-to-date employee handbook, this will make it easy for everyone to be on the same page. In addition, this allows them to refer to it when they feel themselves potentially veering away from the company guidelines. And of course, making yourself available should someone have questions is invaluable as it encourages a comfortable but professional environment. If your culture is a bit more stringent, make sure you relay that early on, as there are also people who thrive just as well in that atmosphere. It’s all good as long as there’s an upfront agreement of what to expect.

When you hire a staffing solutions partner, this is one of the areas where they can be a tremendous help. A quality firm will be experts in gathering and relaying this information to help narrow the field for you.

Create a Solid Hiring Plan

A solid team should consist of the right set of skills and those who have the proper attitude and work well within the culture you have developed.

Now that you’ve solidified your cultural expectations, you will have some good information to begin laying out your plan. When presented with a quality applicant, it makes a terrible first impression only to stumble through the interview because you weren’t clear on your company’s expectations.

You want to:
Determine their skills and how it fits within the job you’re looking to fill
Learn if they will get along with other employees by asking questions that will bring out their personality.

 

Much of this will be determined early on if you are working with a solid recruiter who can have an open conversation with the potential candidate before you even meet them.

Are You Up-to-Date With Laws and Regulations

Just like everything, human resource laws are constantly changing. But, unfortunately, this is one of the most overlooked areas because we get so busy that we may let something as simple as a one-page critical form fall between the cracks.

Ensure you have a system in place so that they are provided with the necessary forms to complete as required by law each time you onboard a new employee. And once you have the paperwork, designate a secure place to store them out of reach of other employees. Go digital when possible but remember some forms, should you be audited, are still required to be in the form of paper. If possible, delegate this process to a member of HR or another leader within your company.

Whatever system works for you, there must be something in place. It also demonstrates that you’re a professional company to potential candidates.

And, when in doubt, consult your CPA or attorney so that you know the information you are handing out is legitimate.

As a business owner, there is already a great demand for your attention. Making sure you address these Human Resource challenges properly could be one of the best decisions you make for your business.
31Mar
Part of a recruiter’s responsibility is to manage their candidate’s expectations and provide the employer with the best fit. These factors include the right experience, skillset, and mindset to match the company’s culture.
The following blog is to help employers better understand how we can best work together for the absolute best outcome.
The candidate sent to you just wasn’t your cup of tea. Should you give your recruiter the reason(s)?
YES! A top-notch recruiter will rarely be off-the-mark when they send you their candidate’s shortlist.

Both the recruiter and candidate have traveled an intense path to get to this point; explaining why it’s a “no” in further detail will go a long way to help both the recruiter and candidate to have more success in the future.

If the candidate was late, appeared frumpled, or didn’t smell fresh, was rude or unprepared, those are legitimate reasons, and if working with an experienced recruiter, it should RARELY happen.

The recruiter spends hours working with the candidate to get a true sense of their demeanor as their reputation depends on your satisfaction.

There are also instances where it may not be about the candidate’s skills or experience but something that rubbed you the wrong way. We’ve heard it all:
  • Did the candidate show up far too early and caused a mild interruption while your staff tried to make them comfortable ahead of schedule?
  • Did the candidate abbreviate or mispronounce your name?
  • Did they appear nervous and repeatedly use “um” in between words?
  • Were you having a bad day, and the time you thought you had for the interview was interrupted by a client emergency?

We all have our pet peeves, but the employer is the leader, and your opinion is valued. If one of the above, or similar, went “wrong,” we highly encourage you to be open to what the candidates’ skills and experience can bring to your company.

With open communication, something the recruiter can tackle on your behalf, you can overcome the more minor pet peeves.

Whether it’s something minor or even more severe, we urge you to be honest with the recruiter about your decision. It will help both the recruiter and candidate for future interviews.

There are current trends with other employers that you’re not ready to embrace right now.

Many companies are offering remote opportunities, and it may happen in the future for you, but you’re just not there yet. Be honest about that, and if you can offer a safe environment, we will know that’s a deal-breaker if we have a candidate that is only seeking to work from home.

Let us know if the door is slightly open for that scenario should we find the perfect fit to decide based on the individual.

If you are looking for someone who doesn’t have one foot out the door at 5 pm, please let us know that. We may have the perfect candidate, but he/she may have personal obligations that require them to be home at a specific time. There are many ways to compromise so that it’s a win-win.

The more we know upfront, the better we can serve your needs. An experienced recruiter with years of experience under their belt can be a sounding board to walk through some of the unknowns.

There may be something holding you back simply because you “don’t know what you don’t know.” Be open, as a recruiter’s goal should always be to find you the best long-term fit.

Exclusive Relationship, or Not?
Recruiters will tell you the exclusive relationship is the best scenario, and they’re right. However, if they are inexperienced or not proactive, it’s a lousy situation for the employer. A qualified recruiter will request an exclusive agreement because they will invest what is needed to:
  • Reach out to the candidates who they know would fit the bill.
  • Make those calls to the passive job seekers with who they’ve developed a confidential relationship. These are the most difficult to reach because they are not openly looking as they are interested in a change but currently in a position.
  • Once they identify the candidates, they will go through all the vetting stages to ensure only those who indeed would be a good fit for your company make the “hot” list.
It’s not to say they wouldn’t implement the above steps if you did not agree on an exclusive relationship. Still, it’s easier to bring one of their highly-qualified and currently employed applicant to the surface if it’s a more exclusive nature.